Avoid Them Like The Plague: 16 Types of Guys Not to Date

types of guys

AVOID THEM LIKE THE PLAGUE: 16 TYPES OF GUYS NOT TO DATE

Tiffany Grace Reyes

He might seem like a catch at first, but try to imagine him without all that first date charm. Or you could read up on these types of guys to avoid.

Dating can provide you valuable experiences and insights into what kinds of guys are out there. It helps you find out just what you like and don’t like in potential mates and relationships. However, the search for that “someone” can be frustrating. It may come to the point where you’re willing to settle for anyone, overlooking certain qualities you actually don’t like just so you can finally say you’re in a relationship.

However, if you’re a smart enough woman, you’ll know that there are just a few things that you should not put up with. There really are certain types of men that you should stay away from. While you may or may not have dated their kind in the past, there’s still time to change your ways and wise up to their quirks.

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Positive Parenting: Accept Feelings, Limit Actions

person and two toddler's playing at the seashore

POSITIVE PARENTING: ACCEPT FEELINGS, LIMIT ACTIONS

Rebecca Eanes

Over the years of moderating a popular parenting page on Facebook, I have had the opportunity to listen to many parents voice their concerns about changing their parenting paradigms to peaceful, positive parenting. One of the major goals of positive parenting is to raise emotionally intelligent children, and this is because research has shown that children with high emotional intelligence are less defiant, mentally healthier, and more successful both academically and in relationships.

Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand, evaluate, and regulate emotions. In our quest to raise emotionally intelligent children, positive parents understand the importance of accepting a child’s feelings. A common misconception is that accepting all feelings means accepting all actions resulting from those feelings, leading to an unruly and disrespectful or spoiled and coddled child.

Feelings are neither right nor wrong. They simply are what they are. We feel what we feel. What we do with those feelings, though, is extremely important, and that is a large part of emotional intelligence. It’s not about just understanding and accepting feelings but also teaching children appropriate actions around those feelings.

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Being Brave Together

Fear

BEING BRAVE TOGETHER

Famifi

We all want fearless kids, right? Little people who can jump off high dives, check under their own beds for monsters, and brave their way through Halloween night. So how do we help them build up the resilience they’re going to need to do just that?

Developing our kids’ internal compass

Kara Fic leans on lessons learned from her own childhood as she now raises two daughters, one of whom was recently heading out the door on her first solo commute to a school across town. Kara says she slipped her camping compass into the 11-year-old’s hand as she ventured out: “She’s ready for this new challenge,” says Kara, “but it’s still a big city. The compass is really just there as a backup in case she gets disoriented—and as a reminder that she’s navigated denser forests than this.”

Kara refers to the many campouts her family has taken together over the years when her daughters were first earning their stripes as Girl Scouts—and teaching the boys a thing or two about bravery in the process. Bears, bees, rain and rations toughened up the girls, Kara explains, as they did during her own Girl Scout days. She’s happy about how her daughters’ wilderness training now spills over into their city life—and into their fear management in general.

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Proven Strategies To Help Your Kids Manage Fear

Parent and Child Swimming

PROVEN STRATEGIES TO HELP YOUR KIDS MANAGE FEAR

Famifi

Helping our children manage their fears can be a complex task. And with every kid being different, no one strategy fits all.

We put together this list of 10 strategies and 6 books to get your kids facing and conquering their fears:

Strategies

• Find examples of kids being brave in books or films and talk about how those stories relate to the fear he or she is currently experiencing.

• Help them make fear manageable: Feel it, label it, share it, watch it go. Then make a plan for the next time fear shows up.

• Find ways to be brave together: take family adventures – camping, hiking, standing up for convictions, trying things outside your comfort zone.

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Conversations: What Keeps You Up at Night as a Parent?

People Talking

CONVERSATIONS: WHAT KEEPS YOU UP AT NIGHT AS A PARENT?

Famifi

Parents gather in all kinds of communities to talk about things that matter most to them. Here we asked two moms and a dad what keeps them up at night as they think about their families.

Jane:

My kids, so far, are pretty confident and self-possessed, so my biggest fear isn’t that they’re heading toward some cataclysmic meltdown, or whatever else typically ranks high on the lists of parent fears. My anxiety is much more mundane and basic. It’s really just about money. Not crazy amounts, mind you. My concern is about having enough to cover just really basic things. That’s a concern that has yet to go away. And to see the rich parents around me every day, (none of you lovely people, of course…) but to see them in their expensive highlights and handbags…from the signals they’re putting out, I’m not sure it ever does go away—for any of us. I’m talking about moms with crazy resources at their disposal but from the look of their clenched jaws and nervous eyes, it doesn’t look to me like they have any more peace of mind than I do. I would guess that behind many of those manicured, boxwood hedges there is plenty of stress too. Not from personal experience mind you…but I think money creates about as many problems as it solves. So give me my middle class family and middle class problems any day, because I know how to handle them. …But I do still worry.

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5 “Notes to Self” About the Precious Little Time You Have Left

5 “NOTES TO SELF” ABOUT THE PRECIOUS LITTLE TIME YOU HAVE LEFT

Marc Chernoff

5 Notes to Self About the Precious Little Time You Have Left

A Good Girl (Who Didn’t Make It)

Alyssa was my best friend.  She was a talented musician, a graceful gymnast, a brilliant writer, and a deeply passionate human being.  She cared about people.  Love bled from every facet of her being.  When she spoke, her eyes were as sincere as her words.  And she always wanted to understand what was wrong so she could strive to make it better.

But Alyssa woke up one day during her senior year in college with a strange pain in her chest.  The on-campus doctors didn’t understand why, so they referred her to a specialist.  After several MRIs and blood tests, they determined that she had a rare, escalated case of Hodgkin’s lymphoma—a form of cancer.  She spent the next three years suffering through varying degrees of pain and sickness as multiple doctors treated her with radiation and chemotherapy.  And although these doctors were initially hopeful, Alyssa’s condition worsened, and she eventually succumbed to her cancer, dying on her 25th birthday.

A Bad Guy (Who Did)

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The Joys (and Tears) of Parenting My Adult Children

THE JOYS (AND TEARS) OF PARENTING MY ADULT CHILDREN

Shantel Patu

I watched as she stormed into the house. Peril, sheer peril, if you let her tell it.

She hadn’t noticed me reading, quietly in the corner, so she went about, slamming cabinets and drawers, then finally ending her assault on the kitchen by opening and staring into the fridge. I heard her mumble something about hating her job, her co-workers, her commute, and of course, her meager paycheck that she waited for each week. She was adorable.

I peered over my book and examined her. She was considered an average-sized person, about 5’7”, which was a giant to my 5’1” frame. She had these amazing, almond-shaped, bright brown eyes, which she was constantly complaining about the size and the color of, but to me and her father, they were gorgeous.

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Is Your Single Life Affecting Your Married Life?

IS YOUR SINGLE LIFE AFFECTING YOUR MARRIED LIFE?

Bethany Bartholomew

You did it. You tied the knot. You found your one and only and created a happily ever after together.

It could’ve been yesterday. It could’ve been years ago. Whenever you made it to Mr. and Mrs. status, congratulations! That is a happy event to celebrate and keep celebrating for years to come.

But even though you made the big decision, did you make the big change?

Married life comes with some significant changes in your everyday. Some are obvious, and some are not so obvious. Some are so subtle that you might miss them for years.

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How to Create Sexual Chemistry and Make It Stay

sexual chemistry

HOW TO CREATE SEXUAL CHEMISTRY AND MAKE IT STAY

Jana Snow

Sexual chemistry is a mystery. But when you share it with someone, it can make you jump with excitement. Find out how to create sexual chemistry here.

Ever had a conversation with someone attractive that you hoped would never end?

Ever grazed arms with someone while dancing or at a movie and felt a flirty summersault in your stomach?

Well, that’s you experiencing a taste of sexual chemistry.

If you want to understand more about sexual chemistry in a relationship, read on.

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1 Mental Habit that’s Draining Your Energy (and Blurring Your Vision)

1 MENTAL HABIT THAT’S DRAINING YOUR ENERGY (AND BLURRING YOUR VISION)

Angel Chernoff

Today, I want to remind you that the stories we tell ourselves change EVERYTHING we see. When we enter an experience with a story about how life is, that tends to be what we see, even when there’s plenty of evidence to the contrary. I was reminded of this recently by an attendee at our “Think Better, Live Better 2018” conference (I’m sharing this with her full permission)…

She compared her present marital problems and stress to an old parable in which a group of blind men touch an elephant for the very first time to learn what it’s like. Each one of them feels a different part of the elephant, but only that one part, such as the leg, trunk, side or tusk. Then the men eagerly compare notes and quickly learn that they are in complete disagreement about what an elephant looks like—and lots of tension and drama ensued.

Something similar happens through our wide-ranging, different past experiences. Some of us have been deeply heartbroken. Some of us have lost our parents, siblings or children to accidents and illnesses. Some of us have dealt with infidelity. Some of us have been fired from jobs we relied on. Some of us have been discriminated against because of our gender or race. And, when we enter a new experience that arouses prominent memories of our own painful story from the past, it shifts our perspective in the present—it narrows it.

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